How does your garden grow?

I planted most of my seeds in early March and today I am overrun with seedlings, some of which have been potted up more than once. I guess that’s the good news. The somewhat bad news is that when you plant 28 tomato seeds because you are worried that you might not be successful, you have to deal with the reality of 28 tomato plants. I have thought about planting all 28 but I am fairly certain that I cannot keep up with that many. I seem to have a whole tray of China Aster, too. The seedlings have been hardening off on the porch and I hope to plant them in the newly updated raised beds next week.

Now for an update in the bareroot saga. Planting bareroot has never really worked out for me before so when I bought about 100 bareroot plants and plugs from the Thurston Conservation District, I had low expectations.

Bare Root PlantsAnd then almost everything grew.

I had a couple of ferns that looked iffy from the get-go and one black hawthorn looks like it was the daily special at the critter salad bar (it might be fine). Something dug up a salal plug and I fear the worst but I haven’t given up on it yet. But the other 96 plants are doing great. Anyone need some Douglas Fir saplings?

Adding to the insanity, I bought some bareroot hostas, bleeding hearts and columbines. The columbines and hostas are coming up. Not sure what the bleeding hearts are going to do. So this additional “success” has added to the planting frenzy in my Olympia garden.

Notes to self:

  1. 20 plants sound nice.
  2. Plant seeds expecting most to germinate.
  3. Start earlier with pepper plants. That’s the one area where results were less than I hoped.

Spring is here!

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